Dearborn Opens Rouge River Gateway Trail

The Rouge River Gateway Trail extension is now open in Dearborn, allowing walkers, runners and bicyclists to traverse the paved path from Ford Field Park all the way to Hines Park, through natural areas and the campuses of the University of Michigan-Dearborn and Henry Ford College.

The extension moves the trailhead to Ford Field Park, where users are strongly encouraged to park. The park provides ample parking and safe, easy access to the trail.

The original trail has been extended about 1/3 of a mile. It now stretches behind the Andiamo restaurant, off Michigan Avenue, on an elevated boardwalk. It continues past the restaurant’s west parking lot and along the wooded tree line through the Dearborn Historical Museum property.

From there, it connects to the ex

Mayor John B. O’Reilly, Jr. (center) officially opened the extension of the popular Rouge River Gateway Trail on Nov. 17. He was joined by employees of the Recreation and Parks Department, which oversaw the project; Recreation Commissioners; and business and community leaders. The extension includes a broad wooden platform built behind Andiamo and allows trail users to travel safely from Ford Field Park all the way to Hines Park.

Mayor John B. O’Reilly, Jr. (center) officially opened the extension of the popular Rouge River Gateway Trail on Nov. 17. He was joined by employees of the Recreation and Parks Department, which oversaw the project; Recreation Commissioners; and business and community leaders. The extension includes a broad wooden platform built behind Andiamo and allows trail users to travel safely from Ford Field Park all the way to Hines Park.

sting sidewalks and bike lanes on Brady Street and ultimately to Ford Field Park.

The enhancement to the trail was made possible by a grant from the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, a grant from Michigan Department of Transportation, and city contributions.

The original 2.16-mile paved trail since it was first created in 2005. It wends through natural areas on the banks of the Rouge River and includes two attractive pedestrian bridges, as well as running through the campuses of UM-Dearborn and Henry Ford College.

Along the route, visitors pass the Henry Ford Estate, Environmental Interpretive Center and extensive picturesque natural areas, including a 300-acre mixed-habitat Environmental Study Area, habitats that include one of the few remaining climax beech-maple forests in southeastern Michigan and the Rouge River Bird Observatory. More than 250 species of birds have been spotted in this longest-running full-time urban bird research station in North America.

The trail system, open daily dawn to dusk, includes land owned by Wayne County and City of Dearborn parklands. It also connects with the bike path on Edward Hines Park, north of Ford Road, and goes on to Northville for a total of 19 miles.

DeepSaidWhat.com welcomes your views and encourages lively -- but civil -- discussions. Comments are unedited, but submissions reported as abusive may be removed.

One Response to “Dearborn Opens Rouge River Gateway Trail”

  1. harold goff says:

    I ride my bike everyday on this new pathway & am very concerned about Andiamos also using this path for parking cars. Is it going to take someone getting seriously hurt before something is done! This was not intended for vehicles to use – please make this stop – sooner than later. thank you